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Medical Detox : Understanding your Options

Table of Contents

What Is Medical Detox?

Medical detox is a general term for procedures designed to help a person undergo withdrawal from opiates. Medical detox is always medically controlled and involves drug withdrawal supervised by a physician or other medical experts. This could be rapid medical detox, in which certain medications are used to clear opiates from brain receptors. Rapid medical detox allows a person to undergo the withdrawal process within a few hours, using the assistance of anesthesia to keep patients comfortable.
Medical detox could also involve medication-assisted withdrawal. In this case, withdrawal symptoms are carefully managed by the treating physician. This is an excellent choice for older individuals or people with certain health problems, as the natural withdrawal process can be difficult or even dangerous to tolerate.

Opiate Addiction Treatment

Opiate addiction affects millions of Americans, making it important for people to have access to treatments that work. Medical opiate detox is a safe, effective procedure to help people overcome opiate addiction. This medically controlled drug withdrawal process places patients on the road to a successful recovery.
The most important factor when choosing medical detox is to find a facility that uses individualized assessment to determine a treatment protocol. Some detox facilities use a “one size fits all” approach in which everyone who walks through the door gets the same medical detox protocol. This can be dangerous, as it does not account for unique differences between patients. Instead, a good medical detox program will begin with a thorough medical assessment. This may include consultation with other medical specialists, which is why it is important for the procedure to take place in a full service hospital. Only after carefully assessing a person’s health should a medical detox provider create a treatment protocol.

What Medications Are Used for A Medical Detox?

The specific medications and dosages used during medical detox depend on the patient. These may include medications to clear opiates from receptor sites in the brain, pain management medications, or other medications to support health during the medically supervised withdrawal process. Only after assessing your unique physical background and medical needs should a physician decide on medications that will keep you safe and comfortable during medical detoxification.

How Long Does Medical Detox Take?

Medical detoxification procedures are best when they take place on an inpatient unit in a full service hospital. Some medical detox programs operate from surgery centers in which a patient cannot stay more than 24 hours. Discharging patients to a hotel room or their homes before they have fully stabilized can be detrimental to the recovery process. This is why it is essential for medical detox providers to take an individualized, flexible approach to treatment.
The specific length of stay depends on a patient’s medical history. There cannot be a pre-determined plan that will not be changed. Instead, medical detox is a flexible process in which an inpatient stay may be extended or medications may be adjusted based on a patient’s needs. Patients respond differently to detoxification based on age, dependence history, physical status, emotional state, and other personal factors. Thus, it is important to have supportive medical providers on hand and the ability to extend a patient’s stay based on the body’s needs.

Questions to Ask before Undergoing Medical Detox

Medical detox is a safe procedure, but it is important to find a provider that cares about your health. Ask the following questions when seeking medical detox at an inpatient facility:

  • Is there a “one size fits all” medical protocol for all patients regardless of age, physical health, or dosage needs?
  • What changes will be made within the same facility if a patient reacts differently to the withdrawal than expected? Will they stay at the facility or be transferred elsewhere for others to care for them?
  • What are the credentials of the treating doctor?
  • What is the treating doctor  experience with medical drug detox?
  • Is the facility accredited?
  • Is there additional medical specialists available if needed?
  • What percentage of people who start a medical detox actually complete it?
  • What is the estimated time required for the medical detox? Can it change if needed?
  • Will the patient leave the medical detox opiate free or just switched to a replacement drug?
  • Are patients provided a private room, or do they share a space with strangers?
  • Are patients thoroughly care for around the clock a few days by experienced professionals or are they handled to a family member for additional care ?
  • Are there any restrictions on watching television, smoking, making telephone calls, eating meals, or Internet access?
  • What are the comments of former patients about their experiences at the facility?

Waismann Clinic Medical Detox Difference

Each patient is unique, with a different history and profile . At the Waismann Method Medical Detox Center, we incorporate the most advance medical procedures with the top detox physicians in the country. We create a individualized detox programs, based on each individuals specific needs. Our patients are treated in their private rooms, where all attention and cared is directed towards them. We prioritize safety, privacy and the dignity of each patient. The most successful medical detox procedures result from treating the patients, not just their symptoms.
CALL 1-310-205-0808 TODAY AND SPEAK TO ONE OF OUR EXPERIENCED & CARING DETOX ADVISERS!

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