heroinHeroin is a powerful semi-synthetic opiate derived from morphine most often used as a recreational drug. It delivers and intense “rush” and is more powerful than most opioid analgesics because it crosses the blood-brain barrier more rapidly. Use of heroin leads quickly to dependence and has a high potential for addiction.

Heroin is known to cause “blissful apathy” along with its painkilling effects.

Withdrawal symptoms can develop within three days if used regularly and stopped abruptly – much quicker than the onset of withdrawal from some other opiates including oxycodone and hydrocodone.

Heroin was first synthesized from morphine in 1874. Until 1910, it was marketed as a non-addictive cough suppressant and substitute for morphine. The Harrison Narcotics Tax Act, passed in 1914, was meant to control the sale of heroin and other opiates. Heroin could be prescribed for medical purposes until 1924, when Congress banned the sale, import or manufacturing in the U.S. Most of it consumed in the U.S. comes from Columbia, Mexico, Canada, Afghanistan and China. Other top-producing countries include Thailand, Vietnam and Laos.

Heroin Abuse

Heroin causes rapid tolerance and physical dependence. In combination with its euphoric effects, and almost immediate addiction potential, this causes many users extreme difficulties when attempting to curtail the use on their own.

Once physically dependent, one can experience extremely unpleasant withdrawal symptoms, therefore causing the user to continue use to simply avoid the withdrawal syndrome. Some common street names for Heroin include chiva, dope, smack and junk.

Heroin uses

Heroin can be taken orally, snorted, smoked or injected. Some users inhale the vapors when it is heated. Oftentimes,   is “cut” with other substances to dilute it or add bulk.

A mixture of heroin and cocaine, known on the street as a “speedball,” can be fatal. A heroin/fentanyl mix caused an outbreak of overdoses in several American cities in 2006.

Dangers of intravenous use include transmission of hepatitis and HIV from contaminated needles and syringes, abscesses, chronic constipation and poisoning from ingredients and other drugs used to dilute it.

Some countries provide needle exchange programs to provide users with clean supplies. While some argue this helps cut the transmission rate of infectious diseases, others say it amounts to governments’ acceptance of heroin use.

Heroin Side Effects

Common side effects associated with its use include:

  • Drowsiness
  • Euphoria
  • Disorientation
  • Delirium
  • Shallow breathing
  • Weak pulse
  • Respiratory depression
  • Lowered heart rate
  • Nausea
  • Vomiting
  • Dry mouth
  • Constipation
  • Muscle spasms
  • Confusion
  • Rash and itching
  • Physical and psychological dependence

Heroin Withdrawal

Withdrawing can be painfully intense and most often requires medically supervised detox. Withdrawal symptoms can set in within a few hours of last use and include:

  • muscle spasms
  • sweating
  • insomnia
  • itching that leads to compulsive scratching
  • anxiety
  • depression
  • cramps
  • cold sweats
  • yawning
  • sneezing
  • chills
  • muscle and bone aches
  • nausea
  • vomiting
  • diarrhea and fever.

Methadone is most often used as a substitute to help wean users from the drug. While it has shown some success, it too is an addictive opiate that may require detox. Buprenorphine is also used in substitution therapy, making it hard for users to get high, except when taken in very large doses. Opioid antagonists, which block the ability of heroin and other opiates from binding to receptor sites in the brain, include naloxone and naltrexone. Alternative detox programs, such as Waismann rapid detox, have shown the highest success rate for heroin detoxification

An Effective Heroin Treatment

Effective drug detox programs, such as rapid detox through the Waismann Method, have shown the highest success rate for heroin detoxification.

Waismann Method Medical Group has been offering  a medical solution for those suffering from heroin addiction.  We utilize the  most advanced medical detoxification methods available today, and we perform heroin Rapid Detox and other forms of  medical heroin treatments. We are located exclusively in Southern California, where we receive patients weekly from all over the globe into our full service private hospital. By focusing on a single location, we have   maintained our position as the leader in rapid detox services in the world. Our state of the art hospital and post care facility, is backed by 17 years of experience, dedication and unparalleled reputation for superior medical care.

If you or someone you love, is suffering from heroin addiction, and you want the best treatment available, give us a call today at 310-205-0808. We are here seven days a week for you!

ADDITIONAL HEROIN RELATED TOPICS

HEROIN REHAB

HEROIN ABUSE

HEROIN EPIDEMIC

HEROIN WARNINGS

HEROIN OVERDOSE

TO GET OFF HEROIN

HEROIN WITHDRAWAL

HEROIN SIDE EFFECTS

HOW HEROIN GETS YOU HIGH

VOTERS SAY “YES” TO HEROIN

HEROIN ABUSE AND ADDICTION

THE COMEBACK OF HEROIN ABUSE

THE RISING RATE OF HEROIN ABUSE

HEROIN ADDICTION: YOUNG AND WILD

HEROIN USE METHODS AND ITS EFFECTS

DON’T GIVE HEROIN TO HEROIN ADDICTS

 

 

FENTANYL, MORE POTENT THAN HEROIN?

OXYCONTIN ADDICTION: HILLBILLY HEROIN

CARFENTANIL LINKED TO HEROIN OVERDOSES

HEROIN WITHDRAWAL SYMPTOMS AND DETOX

HEROIN USE INCREASING IN AMERICA’S YOUTH

HEROIN INJECTION SITES: HELPING OR HARMING?

U.S. EXPERIENCES RESURGENCE OF HEROIN ABUSE

THE TRUTH ABOUT CELEBS AND HILLBILLY HEROIN

THE RAPID INCREASE IN HEROIN OVERDOSE DEATHS

RAPID HEROIN DETOX VS. STANDARD HEROIN DETOX

PAINKILLER ABUSE LEADS TO HEROIN ADDICTION CRISIS

THE EFFECTS OF HEROIN USE ON THE BRAIN AND BODY

CELEBRITY HEROIN ADDICTS OPT FOR ULTIMATE QUICK FIX

HEROIN TREATMENT PROGRAM & DETOXIFICATION OPTIONS

HEROIN ADDICTION: INFORMATION, SYMPTOMS & TREATMENT

HEROIN ABUSE LEADS TO HIGHEST HEPATITIS C RATE IN NATION

TOP-QUALITY HEROIN FLOODS U.S. AS AFGHAN POPPY TRADE GROWS

EFFECTS OF HEROIN ABUSE ON EMOTIONAL PROCESSING AND STRESS

W METHOD ASSISTS VICTIMS OF GROWING HEROIN EPIDEMIC IN THE U.S.

PAIN PILL INJECTORS HAVE HIGHER RISK OF HEPATITIS THAN HEROIN USERS

HEROIN OVERDOSE & ADDICTION: EXACERBATED BY GUILT, SHAME & BLAME

WAISMANN METHOD® RAPID DETOX PROGRAM ADDRESSES HEROIN EPIDEMIC

MORE PEOPLE ADDICTED TO PRESCRIPTION DRUGS ARE TURNING TO HEROIN

TEENS FOLLOW ‘OXY’ BRIDGE TO HEROIN OXYCONTIN POWERFUL PAIN-KILLER

U.S. SENATE PASSES BILL TO COMBAT PAINKILLER ABUSE & HEROIN ADDICTION

ALARMING RISE IN HEROIN DEATHS LINKED TO OPIATE PAINKILLER PRESCRIPTIONS

HEROIN BECOMES DRUG OF CHOICE AMONG AFFLUENT PAIN MEDICATION PATIENTS

HEROIN USE SURGES WHILE OVERDOSE DEATHS QUADRUPLE IN THE UNITED STATES

HEROIN DETOX, WITHDRAWAL SYMPTOMS, ADDICTION TREATMENT AND RAPID DETOX

FACTORS THAT CONTRIBUTE TO HEROIN ABUSE AND ITS LONG TERM CONSEQUENCES

 

USE OF HEALTH CARE RESOURCES AMONG THOSE WHO NEED HEROIN ABUSE TREATMENT

WAISMANN METHOD WITNESSES SURGE IN HEROIN ABUSE AMONG TEENS AND YOUNG ADULTS

WAISMANN METHOD® DIRECTOR URGES IMMEDIATE ACTION TO COMBAT HEROIN USE EPIDEMIC

WAISMANN METHOD: PRESCRIPTION PAINKILLER/HEROIN OVERDOSE ANTIDOTE APPROVED BY FDA

WAISMANN METHOD® SUPPORTS GOV. SHUMLIN’S FOCUS ON DRUG TREATMENT AND HEROIN ADDICTION

MISINTERPRETING BUPRENORPHINE AS MIRACLE CURE FOR OPIATE DEPENDENCY TO END HEROIN ADDICTION

ABUSE-DETERRENT FORMULATION OF OXYCONTIN ALLEGEDLY RESPONSIBLE FOR INCREASE IN HEROIN USERS

WAISMANN METHOD MEDICAL GROUP CONCURS WITH REVIEW IN NEW ENGLAND JOURNAL OF MEDICINE FINDING NO ASSOCIATION BETWEEN ONGOING SURGE IN HEROIN ABUSE AND STRICTER OPIOID PRESCRIBING POLICIES

 

 

HEROIN DETOX TESTIMONIAL 4

HEROIN DETOX TESTIMONIAL 5

HEROIN TESTIMONIAL FEBRUARY 2009 NEW YORK

HEROIN TESTIMONIAL MAY 2009

HEROIN TESTIMONIAL JUNE 2009

HEROIN TESTIMONIAL JUNE 2009 TEXAS

HEROIN TESTIMONIAL OCTOBER 2009 OREGON

HEROIN TESTIMONIAL FEBRUARY 2010 CALIFORNIA

HEROIN TESTIMONIAL FEBRUARY 2010 ARIZONA

HEROIN TESTIMONIAL AUGUST 2010 CALIFORNIA

HEROIN TESTIMONIAL DECEMBER 2010 CALIFORNIA

 

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